Thursday, September 3, 2009

That Theory Explained

I'm speaking at some shindig today and have to explain something technical. I'll start with this and work up. :-)

.AFRICAN SWALLOW. . . . . . EUROPEAN SWALLOW

.Airspeed Velocity of an Unladen Swallow - by Dr. Brigid

Talk to you all Friday when I get home!

24 comments:

  1. Cheat sheet for you: http://www.style.org/unladenswallow/ .
    Have fun...:)
    Rick

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  2. That European swallow's gonna stall.

    wv: nutwid

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  3. Nicely done, you laid out the whole African vs European thing quite nicely, roight....now whats your favorite color?

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  4. Today's lecture... Some Birds Were just meant to Crash and Burn?

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  5. But that doesn't account for the Reynolds Number differential of the airfoils between the two species nor the induced drag from the fuselage ... er ... bodies.

    Favorite color: Scarlet, fuchsia and cerise (with burgundy trim)

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  6. Funniest wake up read I've had in a long time.

    Thanks

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  7. I hate that my first thought was laminar flow v. turbulent flow... merely a flesh wound. ;)

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  8. Boundary layer flow! Wicked, brings me back to undergrad days.

    Got some thermo info in your slides as well?

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  9. What if the swallows have spin on them, like a football or a rifle bullet?

    What is the velocity of both sparrows out of a Sparrow Gun?

    What if the sparrows are labeled "armour piercing"? Can you still buy them?

    What sparrow for hawk?

    Where do you carry your back-up sparrow?

    Shootin' Buddy

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  10. So, the African Swallow's obviously superior wings don't allow the air flow to separate, therefore no induced vortices and lessened drag?

    I thought everyone knew that! :)

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  11. Boundary layer air flow.

    Guess one has it and the 'tother doesn't.

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  12. LOL

    What fraction of your audience caught the connection to Monty Python - Holy Grail?

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  13. I missed it! Aaarrggghh!

    http://www.armory.com/swallowscenes.html

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  14. All I could think of was how much do I need to lead them and what choke would work the best...

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  15. Wi nøt trei a høliday in Sweden this yer?

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  16. What effect does carrying the coconut have on the different aerodynmics of each bird? And does it matter if it is an African coconut or one from Cornwall?

    ***I have seen palm trees in Cornwall***

    ;-)

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  17. Nothing to do with this post, but I thought you might be interested...
    http://flyingantiqueairplanes.blogspot.com/2009/09/around-and-around-we-go.html

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  18. What a way to wake up! I remember our college aerodynamics class, wherein we were making an L/D curve for a sample airfoil section, and were quite distracted when one of the guys started feeding popcorn twists into the intake of the wind tunnel.

    Jim

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  19. If you start with that, the punch line would have to be terrific.

    Otherwise someone's going to stick up his hand and say "excuse me, old woman".

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  20. Now that's what I needed today!

    Thanks

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  21. So, the European swallows have micro vg's installed? Boundary layer vortexes will not greatly impact cruise speed, but the definitely help greatly with preventing boundary layer separation at slow speed and decreasing stall speed for increased slow flight performance!

    That's really quite odd - we must be talking World War II swallows, then, because these days the European fliers are all about decreasing performance in the name of strict noise control, while the African fliers are happily (if very slowly) adopting some of the Alaskan bush modifications (where appropriate for their environment).

    And where would a European Swallow get an external load permit for that coconut, anyway? You know how hard those things are to get out of scaredy-cat ban-everything bureaucracies?

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  22. On a Wing and a Whim - hehehe. You're on to me. I read aerodynamics for Naval Aviators too often.

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  23. Stop. I can't handle this technical stuff. Stop. Write more about bacon. Stop. Bacon, bacon, bacon. Stop.

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  24. Brigid,

    I still sometimes wince when I look at that book on my bookshelf - first class I ever got docked points for not interpreting and drawing smooth enough curves between data points on graphs!

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