Tuesday, December 29, 2015

Great Balls of Pancake

I've made Danish pancakes before, a common Scandinavian dessert in Christmas (and breakfast here) but I always had to borrow a friends pan. Since I got one of my own - it was time to make another batch.
The batter is similar to pancake batter but it has a very fluffy but slightly denser texture and you use a knitting needle or wooden skewer to turn them as they cook to form the round shape.  They're scented with vanilla and cardamom and they are like little soft, fluffy balls of goodness,especially with a syrup, powdered sugar, and blackcurrant preserves.
You'd be surprised how high the dog will jump if you toss one of these like a tennis ball.
Mom - here's one left

9 comments:

  1. Got one of these last year but am a real klutz at trying to turn them over correctly! Mine always turn out with flat sides, or with only half the batter left after I finish butchering them. SIGH, maybe I'll be able to do it when I grow up!!

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    1. Everett - I had the best luck with the knitting needle or skewer. Make sure the initial heat is medium high to get a good firm cook on the bottom (about a minute and a half). Then take one side and pull up until it's standing on end, vertical. Some batter will then pool down into the pan. Wait another minute than pull that over so that the original cooked side is on top. That should help with the "round".

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  2. So that's what I have been doing wrong. No knitting needle. Bought one years ago and explained the joy's of these to my DH only to have what can only be described as, only fit for the dog, and after two tries it has been languishing in the far reaches of the cupboard. It's getting dragged out today as is the knitting needle for it's trial run in the new year. Thanks for the instructions. Loved these as a kid growing up with a Swedish grandmother. Happy New Year to all.

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    1. My husband is going to try his hand at them today, but use a little eggnog in the batter. Being an engineer he probably won't be content to just use a knitting needle and will try something Wallace and Gromit would be proud of. Happy New Year!

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  3. A Dane here: we do not eat them for breakfast, ever. We have them with coffee in the afternoon or evening, in lieu of cake. Powdered sugar and blackberry preserve, yes, but never syrup. Syrup is just not used here at all, except as a recent American import, as we don't have trees to make it.

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    1. Thanks for letting me know. My grandmother was born and raised in Sweden and this is the way she fixed them for us as children so I just assumed that was the standard. Apparently, she simply used what was on hand, and what she knew we would like. Happy New Year to you and your family!

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    2. Thank you so much. You, too. I'm actually a longtime reader, equally interested in guns, good food, your career (write more about that, please) and your excellent writing on friendship, family and faith.

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    3. A tip for your husband, if he wants to tinker: The 'æble-' in 'æbleskiver' means apple. Way back a tiny bit of apple was put in the middle, but nobody does that anymore. Worth a try, though.

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    4. I'll try the apple. I'm not at liberty to discuss my career on social media, that is seriously frowned upon. Sorry.

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