Tuesday, July 28, 2009

So how is that reloading going?

I'm learning a lot. The way I usually do. The hard way. Since I'm off to another state to speak at a conference tomorrow I will leave you with some reading material until my return.
Photobucket

27 comments:

leadchucker said...

Oh yes, the crushed case... I usually do that AFTER I've seated the primer. Man I hate wasting primers....

Rev. Paul said...

Thank you for the laughs. Travel safely.

Steve said...

Leadchucker -

In the past, I have VERY SLOWLY fed the case back into the sizing die, to push the primer back out, to be used again. If the case is bunged up like those in the picture, I'll try using a bigger caliber sizing die. I've used a 45 ACP die to de-prime bunged up 38 special cases.

Insert legalese mumbo-jumbo here: As always, do this at your own risk. Real slow works for me. Going too fast may cause undesired explosion of the primer. Not liable if you do this, just letting you know what I've done to salvage a viable primer without unexpected BOOM.

Joe said...

And if no one has mentioned it to you, Brigid, reloading areas and vacumm cleaners are mutually exclusive!

Robert Langham said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-8xLVTkb_o

Just a little something to lift your spirits while recovering from reloading.

Old NFO said...

Travel safe.

Oswald Bastable said...

It's always the 90 cent .455 webley cases, not the cheap 9mm that get crunched!

Did it MY way said...

Oh the joys of reloading. When you load a thousand rounds it means it's range time. Just so you can come back and do it again.

Off to the range.

See ya

Aanoosh said...

Travel safely, and hurry home. Oh yes, and be sure to eat well during your conference.

Jim C said...

Many years ago while at the range my uncle was complaining about issues he was having with reloading .257 Roberts cases. A mutual friend laughed saying he never had such problems with his cap and ball revolver.

His next shot promptly chain fired not two but three cylinders. Shaken, but not injured, he agreed that all firearms can have "reloading" problems.

Have a good trip.

Turk Turon said...

I used to reload shotgun shells. I had five presses for three different gauges and I made a LOT of reloads. One evening we had a power failure and I had to look for something near the reloading bench. In the beam of the flashlight, there was this sparkling all over my reloading bench. It was weird, like "pixie dust" or something, it sparkled under the flashlight, but I had never noticed it before. When the power came back on, I got on the web and asked about it. It was primer dust: lead pychrate or whatever. So Joe is right: no vacuum cleaners in the reloading area.

YeOldFurt said...

Cool pic. Been there, done that. Trial & error teaches. Good point.
YeOldFurt

loneviking said...

When duct tape won't help? So, when a case is belled too big, I can't put a little piece of tape around the base of the bullet so that it seats nice and tight? Sigh...there goes another trick.

Kinda like with wadcutters and the advice to 'seat 'em flush'. Which really means seat them at the third little collar on the bullet, not sink 'em all the way in!

And don't even get me started on military crimps. I still can't tell what is the crimp. All I know is that if I take a reamer, turn it in the pocket enough times, eventually I'll be able to get a primer in the pocket. Unless I have to chase a primer across the floor. I wonder if a magnet will work to retrieve primers?

There's so much info that is left out of modern reloading manuals....

Buffboy said...

Actually, you can use a vacuum cleaner for primers, just make sure the bag(it must be a bag, preferably rather new) is BEFORE the motor/impeller, not the other way around.

Turk, you likely saw the ash or metallic slivers from the burnt powder left after depriming/sizing. It reflects nicely.

Kendra said...

Great book! Going on the Christmas list for my BF, who is our gun and ammo expert. Although I seriously doubt there's much if anything new he would learn from it, he does enjoy reading such books. Thanks again, Brigid! You're a wealth of information!

Top of the Chain said...

It's not pepper? No wonder my hash last night had such an explosive flavor!

immagikman said...

Those shells look very familiar...who's been in my basement?

Crucis said...

Leadchucker... Yep, I've had to dump a few in a water bucket after crunching the brass. Next is getting the primer inserted upside down. That's a winner too!

Joe... that's the easy way to know that you've found all the primers from that spilled tray last week.

RC said...

I'm about to embark down the reloading path. My father used to do it... wished I'd paid attention way back then...;-)

Break a leg Brigid, (and safe trip).

keith said...

It happens.

I've got a coffee can full of "bad brass" in my reloading corner. Most examples are just used up with split case mouths or crinkled shoulders from being resized one too many times but there are several "OOPS" cases in there too.

Being the thrifty type, I plan to eventually figure out how to use that brass to plate some cast bullets. I haven't done that yet but just having the plan takes some of the pain out of wasting the brass.

As you climb the learning curve, (I call it paying the idiot tax, but that refers just to me ;) ),
you'll have fewer and fewer "OOPS" examples.

Have a safe trip.

Keith

Crucis said...

Before I forget. If you haven't gotten one yet, get a kinetic bullet puller. That lets you re-do some errors such as noticing that the primer is upside down after you've seated and belled the bullet.

The steps on me deck out back has several "dents" where I used the bullet puller to correct some mistakes. Also note, when removing the primer---don't be Jack Armstrong. Take it slow and easy.

Buffboy: You know you've found all the primers when the vac quits popping. My old Hoover survived. Sounds like very LOUD popcorn. :-(

Harry said...

What does that mean on the cover, "More Isn't Better?"

Have a good trip.

H the Chemist (and IH too).

Owen said...

I am one of those people that reads but forgets to comment. I deeply enjoy reloading and i've deeply enjoyed reading your adventures. I refer all my friends to your blogs when it's about reloading.

DirtCrashr said...

I found primers! One man, one single stage press...

H the IH said...

B - that ("more isn't better") was supposed to be funny. You DO need a vacation! (Though when I do thermite demonstrations, the fire department ALWAYS believes that "more IS better")

Have a good trip!

H the IH/Chemist/Whatever I need to be

keith said...

Not a correction, but a clarification for your non-reloading readers:

Too much charge means greater than the largest charge listed in whatever reloading guide you're using as a reference.

The manufacturer's reloading guides don't generally publish unsafe data and the best accuracy is often (but not always) found near the max charge listed.

In every case, a reloader should start at the suggested starting charge weight for powder and slowly work their way up.

Keith

RC said...

My first box of .45 ACP Reloads. We'll see how they shoot later this evening...;-)

http://i775.photobucket.com/albums/yy34/robcam817/Reloads/P1010945.jpg

http://i775.photobucket.com/albums/yy34/robcam817/Reloads/P1010938.jpg

http://i775.photobucket.com/albums/yy34/robcam817/Reloads/P1010945.jpg