Tuesday, July 9, 2013

Thank You for Leaving Your Brass . .

But they are more "splody" if the primer is in the other way.

I can get away with saying that, being an "expert" in reloading and all. :-)
Oh come on, I can buff those out.

20 comments:

  1. I've seen some like that before. Some even jammed in sideways, too...and bullets set do loose that they fall inside the casing...And that's on stuff I didn't roll myself!

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  2. Dang!

    I thought I was pretty good at reloading until a friend asked me to reload some 38-40. Almost 10% of my reloads looked like your examples.

    I never appreciated how well designed and manufactured our "common" calibers are for the average reloader. 38-40 is definitely not reloader-friendly.

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  3. LOL! I'm not an expert on the art and science of reloading. I have figured out standard pistol rounds to put holes in paper though!

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  4. Just a little elbow grease when you punch the primer and re-size the case ought to smooth those right out...

    Seems like I've got a Maxwell House coffee can full of those from the last twenty-plus years... from back when coffee came in a metal can...

    Dann in Ohio

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  5. ...how did that buffing out work for ya? huh?
    I'd bet it took a few seconds more time to get the smudges off.

    Rich in NC

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  6. I know nothing about reloading, so are those brass ones?

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  7. Buff them out, yes.
    But you'll need a case trimmer!

    gfa

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  8. I have a coffee can of my misfits.
    I asked the Fire chief for a solution and he said "chuck 'em in the dumpster".
    I don't think so.

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  9. 38-40 & 44-40 are not reloader friendly i have been loading both for the last 30yrs they have some of the thinest brass around and unless you get the case mouth flare just right you will normaly get 3 or 4 case buckle per 50rds.

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  10. Monkeywrangler - sideways? I could see that. I can imagine though.

    JoeMama- it's not as easy as it looks, but I'm getting better at it.

    Skip - I try and find a use for most everyhing, so I understand.

    Keads - it's a lot of fun though, though I have to say the box of ammo that came from Midway recently all ready made was a real treat.

    Dann - just one can?

    Rich - heh!

    Armed Laugning - no kidding!

    Brighid - I've a pan of brownies with chopped sea salted dark chocolate pieces in it (with coffee used instead of water - wheee!) coming out of the oven in a second for the guys at work and I have to scoot. I'll hollar at you tonight with some info on the reloading thing.

    On the plus side folks, doc said the stress fracture and infection in the foot is healed and I can get rid of frankenshoe and go back to field duty next week! (like I'll miss my desk).

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  11. Glad to hear the foot is on the mend. :) I must have missed where you told us how you got that fracture ;)

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  12. Yay! on getting rid of the frankenboot.

    I found one of those backwards loaded primer rounds the hard way. During a Bullseye match. Fortunately, it was during the slow fire session, so I simply replaced it and kept going. And it was a factory round, no less.

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  13. Yay! on getting rid of the frankenboot.

    I found one of those backwards loaded primer rounds the hard way. During a Bullseye match. Fortunately, it was during the slow fire session, so I simply replaced it and kept going. And it was a factory round, no less.

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  14. Was the case empty?

    Then it was 'splodey enough...

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  15. (And "ruined" brass has various uses... find someone who does lost-wax casting, and they'll happily take random high-grade brass off your hands.

    And maybe give you a shiny in return.)

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  16. I had problems with my Dillon 650 that caused me to load MANY primers up-side down and sideways. Took me forever to figure out exactly what was going on; Dillon sent the proper parts and an alignment fixture and all is now well again.

    Have also crunched a few cases like you show. The answer is to buy cartridge brass at the scrapyard, where you get it by the pound. I have at least a 5-gallon bucket each of 9mm, .40 cal, and .38 Special.

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  17. immagikman - One needs a good story. I have a scar just about my left breast (from a skin cancer removal) that looks exactly like a small bite mark. It's visible when I wear something low cut or a bathing suit. People always look, I just say "short Jewish Ninja with overbite".

    This was more mundane, something heavy met Mr. foot in a downward trajectory.

    Sigivad - it was a dud.

    Jim Dunmeyer - instructions from some of the bloggers that are good at this in my garage has helped immensely. Not so many ruined ones now.

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  18. My Dillon started giving trouble after maybe 30,000 rounds, it was nearly flawless before. The problem stemmed from incorrect setup at the factory; the shell plate was being slightly over-indexed, straining the detent ball socket and wearing the guide rails. This caused the shell plate to be positioned incorrectly by just a little bit. Once I convinced the Dillon guy what the problem was, a fix followed immediately. Free, too, that's the way Dillon is.

    Been loading since 1966, don't proclaim to be an expert, but not exactly inexperienced, either. Several close friends are also quite experienced reloaders.

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